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The Guide to Divorce

by | Jul 3, 2014 | Divorce |

  • Attend college: CHECK
  • Graduate college: CHECK
  • College loans: CHECK…
  • Get married: CHECK
  • Get Divorced: NOW WHAT…  happens to our student loans

Unfortunately, this is a common chain of events trending in today’s generation.

Two words which could express both one’s relationship status and student loans after a divorce are, it’s complicated. One may think and individual’s student loans incurred before marriage would have no effect in a divorce. This seems like common knowledge simply because it is a debt that was taken on before the marriage took place, and in some cases, even before the couple even knew each other. With divorce rates increasing, this is a common misconception that is becoming more prevalent and receiving even more attention by young couples today.

Rather than college loans falling merely on the person who’s name the loan was taken out on, the Wall Street Journal tells, “how educational debt is divided may depend on where you live and who benefited from the borrowed money.” The party involved in the divorce which has accrued an astronomical lower amount of debt in college loans, could in fact be responsible for paying off his or her ex-spouses debt, due to foreseeable events predicting that the other party would be able to pay the debt off easier.  In-a-nut-shell, student loans are complicated and every divorce is different having; its own stipulations, complications, and there are exceptions to almost anything.

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304626804579363253873904162

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