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Despite the impact of COVID-19, we are open and continuing to meet the needs of our existing clients and new clients without interruption or change in the quality of our services. Please do not hesitate to contact us with any concerns, questions or requests for information about your matter. At this time we are offering appointments via telephonic and/or video conferencing.
To help out during these trying times we are offering Free Consultations. Click here to Schedule a Consultation.

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Abducted children crossing borders

| May 18, 2015 | Child Custody |

New Jersey residents may benefit from understanding more about the complications that arise from international child abductions by noncustodial parents. Once a child has crossed international borders, the custodial parent may struggle getting them back home. According to the U.S State Department, from 2008 to 2013 there may have been more than 8,000 children in the country who were abducted by one of their parents. More than 1,000 abductions are reported on an annual basis.

Since 2007, the Office of Children’s Issues reportedly receives thousands of requests for assistance with abductions. Even so, abducted children are only returned to the country around 50 percent of the time. However, there are more than 90 countries that are signatories to a treaty that is designed to protect children from abduction and help return them to their resident country.

Politicians say that governments are often cautious when pursuing these custody cases because the issues may become too personal and endanger larger negotiations, such as international aid or trade agreements. In addition, the travel expenses and legal fees involved with pursuing these cases can be hazardous to most parents’ finances. Aside from straining international relationships, these types of cases may challenge the jurisdictional powers of the U.S. court system as well.

Parents who are going through a divorce and who are struggling with custody issues may benefit from consulting legal counsel. If a divorced parent has expressed interest in relocating to a different country, lawyers may be able to provide assistance with establishing terms that are supported by both parties and in the best interest of the child. Legal counsel may be prepared to help address other issues in a proposed parenting plan.

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