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Prolonging divorce may be harder for children

| Mar 29, 2016 | Child Custody |

Some New Jersey parents might take a long time to get divorced after their initial separation. They might be having second thoughts about the divorce, or their friends and family might be trying to persuade them to give the marriage another chance. In some families, religion may play a role in their hesitation to move forward with the process.

The problem is that for their children, this can be very confusing. They may have different reactions to the impending divorce. Some might be relieved because it signals an end to fighting while others might be hoping their parents will get back together. The longer a divorce is prolonged, the more stress children will feel as the situation remains unresolved. Parents who experienced their own parents’ divorce as children might find themselves unable to make a decision because they primarily remember the negative parts of the experience and not positive outcomes such as a more peaceful home life and quality time with both parents.

For the sake of their children, parents need to make a decision and then move ahead with developing their co-parenting relationship. This can help ease children’s trauma. Parents may find that counseling helps them better cooperate with one another and help the children with their adjustment.

One of the most important things parents can do for children during and after divorce is to create a sense of stability and certainty. This includes making a parenting plan. Depending on the situation and the ages of their children, parents may want to have input from them as well. Whether they choose mediation or litigation, parents might want the assistance of their respective attorneys in this regard. Mediation is often the better choice for preserving relationships, but litigation may be necessary if one parent refuses to compromise or there are issues such as drug abuse.

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