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Divorce more likely if the husband is unemployed

| Aug 4, 2016 | Divorce |

It is often hard to predict why some married couples stay together while others decide to divorce. However, a recent study is helping to shed a little light on what makes a marriage more likely to last. New Jersey residents might be interested in knowing that men without jobs may fare worse in marriages than those with full-time jobs.

The study, which was led by a Harvard professor, surveyed more than 6,300 different-sex couples and looked at whether certain factors could predict a marriage’s staying power. Married couples might often fight about money, but the amount of wealth a couple has does not make a divorce more or less likely. When it comes to women, having a career or staying at home also seems to make no discernible difference in marital bliss.

Women are not automatically expected to fulfill traditional homemaking roles, but women still tend to take care of around 70 percent of household chores. Men are expected to help around the house and have gainful employment as those without full-time jobs are more likely to get divorced. The study’s author proposes that more strain might exist in a marriage when the husband does not work because women often choose to stay at home while a man is typically jobless because he cannot find employment. However, more research might be required about relationships where women provide more financial support by choice.

If irreconcilable differences are straining a marriage, divorce may be the best option. When focusing on ending a marriage amicably, a couple could be able to reach a mutually beneficial agreement that saves money compared to litigation. Attorneys could help such couples reach amicable agreements.

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