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Despite the impact of COVID-19, we are open and continuing to meet the needs of our existing clients and new clients without interruption or change in the quality of our services. Please do not hesitate to contact us with any concerns, questions or requests for information about your matter. At this time we are offering appointments via telephonic and/or video conferencing.
To help out during these trying times we are offering Free Consultations. Click here to Schedule a Consultation.

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How can divorce psychologically affect fathers?

| Oct 29, 2018 | Divorce |

Most of the time, men are expected to be strong and stoic, even during the worst of times. American society usually expects men to not be very emotional. Men in New Jersey and elsewhere who are divorcing might be told to “suck it up” during one of the worst times of their lives. It can be especially bad for fathers, who might not have as much time with their children as they are used to.

There is no question that a divorce is devastating for everyone involved, including mothers and children. However, there is little public support and awareness of the feelings of depression and loss that dads can experience during and after a divorce. According to Fatherly, post-divorce depression is common for fathers, which may surprise many. Also surprising are recent studies that suggest men are more likely than women to commit suicide after getting a divorce. They are also less likely to take care of their health, and many die of preventable and treatable health conditions.

Typically, courts favor mothers over fathers, which often results in dads being placed on the back burner and not having as much of a role in their kids’ lives as they used to. This is one of the major causes of depression and feelings of isolation for fathers after a divorce. Loneliness from the loss of a partner can also cause feelings of hopelessness and anxiety. Divorced dads may be prone to smoking, drinking and engaging in risky activities that could fuel depression and cause illnesses or accidents.

Divorced fathers might find solace through support groups and therapy. It might also help to seek experienced legal counsel.

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