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Co-parenting and extracurricular activities

| Aug 24, 2020 | Child Custody |

If you’re a parent who’s going to be divorcing, you want your children to experience as little disruption in their lives as possible. That means continuing with their extracurricular activities. Whether it’s soccer, martial arts, music or theater, these activities can help them grow in to well-rounded adults.

When comes to attending games, recitals and other events around these extracurricular activities, you may want to address some details in your parenting plan. For example, you can stipulate that both parents need to be made aware of and allowed to attend any event. You may also want to address things like how the cost of these activities will be divided and who’s expected to take your kids to and from them.

The reality of co-parenting is never as neat as the parenting plan. That’s why it’s important for both of you to practice civility and provide the same consideration to your co-parent as you expect from them. For example, don’t use these events to hash out your issues (current or past). If they bring a new significant other or a former in-law you can’t stand to an event, don’t get provoked. If you need to, keep your distance. Remember that you’re there for your child.

If there’s a last minute change in an event, make sure that you communicate that to your co-parent. Don’t put that responsibility on your child. There are plenty of co-parenting apps where you can do that without having a conversation or even a text exchange.

What if you run in to problems with your co-parent around a child’s extracurricular activities that you can’t resolve with your co-parent? If those problems are impacting your child or causing significant problems for you, it may be wise to talk with your family law attorney. They can likely offer advice or help you work to seek a modification in your parenting plan.

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