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Is a co-parenting class worthwhile even without your ex?

On Behalf of | Oct 6, 2020 | Family Law |

Co-parenting classes are designed to help parents who are no longer a couple learn to communicate, cooperate and compromise with one another for the well-being of their children. Sometimes a judge will order parents to enroll in a co-parenting class. However, separated or divorced couples sometimes choose to take a co-parenting class to learn how to navigate this new phase of parenthood.

What if your co-parent refuses to participate in a co-parenting class? If a judge has ordered it, they’ll need to comply with the order or risk sanctions. However, they can find ways to put off their participation. If there’s no mandate from the court, you might have a more difficult time persuading your ex to do it.

Whatever the situation, is it worthwhile to take a co-parenting class by yourself?

It certainly can be. One thing that many divorced parents learn is that they don’t have to wait for the other parent to change for things to get better. A co-parenting class can help you develop the skills to improve a situation even when your ex doesn’t respond or behave as you’d like them to.

For example, a co-parenting class can help you recognize the things your co-parent does that trigger you. This can help you control your reactions and emotions to deal with the issue at hand rather than revert back to old arguments and wounds. You can learn how to better handle co-parenting conflicts so that they don’t evolve into fights that only harm your children.

A co-parenting class can also help you better understand your children’s needs. While it’s typically best when both parents can gain these insights, at least you’ll have them — and maybe your co-parent will eventually be receptive to hearing them.

If your co-parent is refusing to take a court-mandated parenting class or if you’re having problems with your co-parent that a class hasn’t been able to help you resolve, talk to your attorney about what legal options you have to help ensure the well-being of your children.

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