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Is nesting beneficial for children during a divorce?

On Behalf of | Aug 10, 2021 | Divorce |

Nesting is a unique idea in the world of family law. It refers to when two parents who are going through a divorce maintain the family home and keep their child in that home during and after the divorce. Instead of worrying about custody and transferring their child from one home to the other, the parents take on that role and come and go from the home on their custodial days.

Nesting is an interesting concept because it allows a child to stay in an environment that they’ve become familiar with. It maintains stability in the home and their routine. They don’t have to switch schools, worry about taking different buses or rides to each home or sticking to a new custody schedule.

Nesting keeps your child’s routine intact

Nesting after divorce keeps your child’s routine intact. Instead of having to move them from one place to another, you, as a parent, would move into your family home during your custodial days. On the days when you don’t have custody, you’d move back out while the other parent moves in.

This can get tricky, because it does require you to maintain a separate residence. For those who are willing to rent another apartment or who have a second home, nesting can be a good option.

Nesting isn’t just beneficial for your child, either. It can also be helpful if you and your ex-spouse would like to wait to sell the family home to get a larger profit. It may also be a good choice if you intend to remain on the property. For example, if you have a duplex, each parent could have one of the sides, so you’d have easy control over custody and could, eventually, rent out your half when you no longer need to live there.

Nesting isn’t for everyone

It should go without saying that nesting isn’t for everyone. It’s usually better in situations where parents get along and want to maintain stability for their child’s or children’s sake. It also requires that both parents can afford to have a second residence, which is something you’ll have to think about closely before deciding if it’s right for you.

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