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Can you mediate a divorce without seeing your ex?

| Nov 6, 2021 | Divorce |

Divorce can be difficult, time-consuming and expensive, especially in high-conflict cases. Issues like adultery and abandonment can lead to very intense divorces, which will usually mean more expense. 

People turn to mediation in part because it keeps the cost of divorcing low. Even though you have to pay for another professional to serve as the mediator, successful mediation will drastically reduce how much time you spend in court and how much your divorce actually costs. 

Mediation can work even in high-conflict divorces, provided that spouses willingly cooperate. However, you can want to resolve your issues out of court while also feeling very strongly that you can’t sit down face-to-face with your ex. However, you may be able to mediate your issues without actually negotiating directly with your ex. 

Mediators frequently separate the parties trying to resolve issues

Traditionally, mediation involves everyone sitting down together, at least for the initial discussion. Eventually, the spouses may separate to discuss matters, with the mediator moving back and forth between the parties. Everyone may reconvene at the end to verify the terms set and sign the necessary paperwork. 

If you have a particularly high-conflict divorce, you may want to arrange for mediation where you don’t talk directly to your ex. In theory, provided that you both prioritize cooperation, you could resolve your property division or custody issues without needing to talk to one another. 

Having intense emotions doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to litigate every step of your divorce. Exploring your different options, like divorce mediation, can help empower you during divorce and possibly keep your costs lower.

 

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